Students release pre-budget submission that encourages smarter investments by government

Posted on February 6, 2017

Halifax, NS – Today, Students Nova Scotia publicly released their submission for the 2017 Nova Scotia budget. The submission, “Investing Smarter in Nova Scotia’s Students” encourages government to make smarter investments by reallocating existing funds to more meaningful programs, expanding the popular “Loan Forgiveness Program” and providing more opportunities for students to work while studying.

More»

Request for Proposals: Student Union Democratic Governance Review

Posted on July 30, 2014

StudentsNS is seeking a consultant to conduct a review of Student Union Democratic Governance in Nova Scotia under the supervision of an Advisory Committee. Participating Student Unions will include the Acadia Students’ Union, Cape Breton University Students’ Union, Dalhousie Agricultural Students Association, Saint Francis Xavier University Students’ Union and Saint Mary’s University Students’ Association. StudentsNS is offering a $10,000 total contract to complete the work (taxes-in) plus incidentals (notably travel).

Student associations are among the only organizations in Canada that represent young people as a demographic group with unique challenges worthy of policy attention. Among such organizations, student associations are likely the most democratically accountable as their leadership is generally elected by memberships numbering in the thousands. They provide unique spaces for incubating young leaders, who are empowered to represent their peers while exercising decision-making over very significant resources.

More»

StudentsNS Introduces New Board Officers

Posted on July 23, 2014

Members of Students Nova Scotia have wrapped up another successful Annual Planning Retreat (APR), welcoming a new board and officers, and setting the group’s priorities for the 2014-15 year. The APR is among the organization’s most important annual meetings, where members hold their Annual General Meeting and establish the direction for the organization’s energy, resources and priorities in the coming year.

“The energy at this year’s AGM and Planning retreat was electric,” said James Patriquin, StudentsNS’s newly elected President. “I think we’re all excited to have the opportunity to work together with such an engaged group of representatives, to address concerns that we know matter to students.” More»

Short note on the Nova Scotia Graduate Retention Rebate

Posted on April 24, 2014

Nova Scotia has been a net loser of youth (ages 20 to 35) each and every year since 1984. We have lost 16,650 young people in the last decade, including 3,200 people in 2013; our highest recorded total in at least 33 years.

By 2036, Nova Scotia is currently projected to have 100,000 fewer working age people relative to 2010, while the population of seniors reliant on expensive healthcare and pension entitlements will nearly double in size.

The Ivany Report’s message was crystal clear. If we can’t turn these numbers around, Nova Scotia faces certain long-term decline, including diminished qualify of life, prolonged economic stagnation, lesser and more expensive public services, less cohesive communities, and degraded cultural institutions. We desperately need more of our own young people to stay and we need to attract many others from beyond our borders.  More»

November in Review

Posted on November 4, 2013

Here’s an excerpt from our November newsletter!

Why not click here and sign up for it?

You wanted news about what StudentsNS is up to and a way to stay plugged in to the important and exciting work it’s doing: here’s a start.

Student Financial Assistance and Tax Credits Report
On November 26th, we released our report From Worst to First: How Nova Scotia Can Lead the Pack on Student Financial Assistance. The report recommends eliminating the Province’s Graduate Retention Rebate, Tuition and Education Tax Credit and Student Loan Interest Tax Credit and reinvest the more than $40 million in savings into the Nova Scotia Student Assistance Program. Specific student assistance program recommendations include eliminating the maximum assistance amount, converting all loans to grants, and building greater fairness into the assessment of parental and spousal contributions. Unlike tax credits, the student assistance program favours students with the greatest financial need, delivers funding to students when they need it, and is an effective tool for youth retention because it reduces student debt; a major factor in graduate’s choice to stay in Nova Scotia. The report was completed by StudentsNS Director of Research Bob Parker.
Draft Housing Report
StudentsNS released a draft report on Off-Campus Housing. The draft argues that universities must play a greater role in planning for how their students are housed and proposes that they significantly expand their affordable rental units to expand the supply of affordable housing. It also recommends changes to the Residential Tenancy Act and related services to protect tenants from abuse of their security deposits and ensure landlords are maintaining their properties. StudentsNS is looking for feedback on the report, written by Brian Foster and Jonathan Williams, before it is scheduled for approval by the Board of Directors in January.
StudentsNS also attended a roundtable organized by HRM Mayor Mike Savage. StudentsNS, in partnership with a number of community organizations and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, has signed a letter calling on the Federal Government to establish a long-term plan for housing, backed by significant investment.
More»

September in Review

Posted on October 3, 2013

Here’s an excerpt from our first-ever monthly newsletter!

Why not click here and sign up for it?

You wanted news about what StudentsNS is up to and a way to stay plugged in to the important and exciting work it’s doing: here’s a start.

September was a busy month for StudentsNS. From Elections to Researcy Papers and firing up this annual cycle of our campaigns, Staff, Board Members and Volunteers have been busy. Here’s some of what we’ve been working on.

More»

«Older